Greater Sacramento region will be under stay-at-home order – KCRA Sacramento

The Greater Sacramento region will be under California’s regional stay-at-home order, effective 11:59 p.m. Thursday, after the area’s available intensive care unit capacity dropped below 15%.The 13 counties in the Greater Sacramento region include:AlpineAmadorButteColusaEl DoradoNevadaPlacerPlumasSacramentoSierraSutterYoloYubaAccording to the state’s COVID-19 website, the region’s remaining ICU capacity on Wednesday had dwindled to 14.3% — down from 18.8% the day before.What the order means for businesses, schoolsWhen the stay-at-home order is imposed, many storefronts won’t be allowed to open. Sectors forced to close include: bars, wineries, personal services, hair salons and barbershops.Retail stores will be limited to 20% capacity, and restaurants will only be allowed to offer to-go orders and delivery.Erika Bjork with the Sacramento Metro Chamber of Commerce spoke with KCRA 3 after the stay-at-home announcement was made. She said the order will affect almost all Sacramento businesses and urged members of the public to support them by ordering online, taking advantage of delivery or curbside pickup and by buying gift cards. Bjork called for congressional representatives to help get relief for small businesses and the unemployed. “We need to have relief,” she said.Schools in regions where the stay-at-home order is in effect may be able to stay open based on decisions by local governments. In a reversal announced Wednesday, state officials said that outdoor playgrounds may remain open. California’s new stay-at-home order, which was announced last week, focuses on five different regions: Northern California, Greater Sacramento, Bay Area, San Joaquin Valley and Southern California. The stay-at-home order is already in place for the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California regions. Several counties in the Bay Area voluntarily joined the rules in an effort to keep area hospitals from becoming overwhelmed amid a surge in COVID-19 cases in California.Once in effect, the stay-at-home order stays in place for at least three weeks. After that period, the order will be lifted when a region’s projected ICU capacity meets or exceeds 15%, according to the California Department of Public Health.COVID-19 in California On Tuesday, the state reached the grim milestone of 20,000 COVID-19-related deaths. During his weekly COVID-19 briefing, state Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly told reporters that virus transmission is so widespread across California that “most all non-essential activities create a serious risk for transmission.”California’s COVID-19 positivity rate saw a 55% increase in the past two weeks — jumping from 5.6% on Nov. 24 to 8.7% on Tuesday, according to the state health department. Over that same period, COVID-19 hospitalizations increased 70.8% and COVID-19 ICU admissions went up 68.7%.| RELATED | Former Sleep Train Arena opens as surge facilityCan’t see the map below? Tap here.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This is a developing story. Stay with KCRA 3 for the latest.

The Greater Sacramento region will be under California’s regional stay-at-home order, effective 11:59 p.m. Thursday, after the area’s available intensive care unit capacity dropped below 15%.

The 13 counties in the Greater Sacramento region include:

  • Alpine
  • Amador
  • Butte
  • Colusa
  • El Dorado
  • Nevada
  • Placer
  • Plumas
  • Sacramento
  • Sierra
  • Sutter
  • Yolo
  • Yuba

According to the state’s COVID-19 website, the region’s remaining ICU capacity on Wednesday had dwindled to 14.3% — down from 18.8% the day before.

What the order means for businesses, schools

When the stay-at-home order is imposed, many storefronts won’t be allowed to open. Sectors forced to close include: bars, wineries, personal services, hair salons and barbershops.

Retail stores will be limited to 20% capacity, and restaurants will only be allowed to offer to-go orders and delivery.

Erika Bjork with the Sacramento Metro Chamber of Commerce spoke with KCRA 3 after the stay-at-home announcement was made. She said the order will affect almost all Sacramento businesses and urged members of the public to support them by ordering online, taking advantage of delivery or curbside pickup and by buying gift cards.

Bjork called for congressional representatives to help get relief for small businesses and the unemployed.

“We need to have relief,” she said.

Schools in regions where the stay-at-home order is in effect may be able to stay open based on decisions by local governments. In a reversal announced Wednesday, state officials said that outdoor playgrounds may remain open.

California’s new stay-at-home order, which was announced last week, focuses on five different regions: Northern California, Greater Sacramento, Bay Area, San Joaquin Valley and Southern California.

The stay-at-home order is already in place for the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California regions. Several counties in the Bay Area voluntarily joined the rules in an effort to keep area hospitals from becoming overwhelmed amid a surge in COVID-19 cases in California.

Once in effect, the stay-at-home order stays in place for at least three weeks. After that period, the order will be lifted when a region’s projected ICU capacity meets or exceeds 15%, according to the California Department of Public Health.

COVID-19 in California

On Tuesday, the state reached the grim milestone of 20,000 COVID-19-related deaths. During his weekly COVID-19 briefing, state Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly told reporters that virus transmission is so widespread across California that “most all non-essential activities create a serious risk for transmission.”

California’s COVID-19 positivity rate saw a 55% increase in the past two weeks — jumping from 5.6% on Nov. 24 to 8.7% on Tuesday, according to the state health department. Over that same period, COVID-19 hospitalizations increased 70.8% and COVID-19 ICU admissions went up 68.7%.

| RELATED | Former Sleep Train Arena opens as surge facility

Can’t see the map below? Tap here.


regional map

This is a developing story. Stay with KCRA 3 for the latest.